CEDAR TREE ACADEMY POLICIES

Cedar Tree Academy is one of the most comprehensive and trusted Early Childhood Schools in the District of Columbia.

Mission


Cedar Tree Academy is committed to academic excellence for all students. We will build the foundation for all students in a safe learning environment designed to enhance social and emotional growth, cognitive and creative development while preparing students to become active independent learners. – No exception, No excuses!


Cedar Tree Academy requires each student to be in full uniform daily. Our uniform consists of a deep green collared polo shirt embroidered with the school logo.

  • For girls: khaki pants, skirt or shorts.
  • For boys: khaki pants or shorts.

Students are required to wear their shirts tucked in. Also, a brown or black belt and shoes are required.

Shoes need to be totally enclosed; no sandals or “mules”.


Cedar Tree Academy Public Charter School’s Wellness Policies on Physical Activity and Nutrition

Preamble:

Whereas, children need access to healthful foods and opportunities to be physically active in order to grow, learn, and thrive;

Whereas, good health fosters student attendance and education;

Whereas, obesity rates have doubled in children and tripled in adolescents over the last two decades, and physical inactivity and excessive calorie intake are the predominant causes of obesity;

Whereas, heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes are responsible for two-thirds of deaths in the United States, and major risk factors for those diseases, including unhealthy eating habits, physical inactivity, and obesity, often are established in childhood;

Whereas, only 2% of children (2 to 19 years) eat a healthy diet consistent with the five main recommendations from the Food Guide Pyramid;

Whereas, nationally, the items most commonly sold from school vending machines, school stores, and snack bars include low-nutrition foods and beverages, such as soda, sports drinks, imitation fruit juices, chips, candy, cookies, and snack cakes;

Whereas, school districts around the country are facing significant fiscal and scheduling constraints; and

Whereas, community participation is essential to the development and implementation of successful school wellness policies;

Thus, Cedar Tree Academy Public Charter School (“CTA”) is committed to providing school environments that promote and protect children’s health, well-being, and ability to learn by supporting healthy eating and physical activity. Therefore, it is the policy of CTA that:

• •

The LEA will engage students, parents, teachers, food service professionals, health professionals, and other interested community members in developing, implementing, monitoring, and reviewing LEA- wide nutrition and physical activity policies.

All students in grades pre-School through Kindergarten will have opportunities, support, and encouragement to be physically active on a regular basis.

Foods and beverages sold or served at school will meet the nutrition recommendations of the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Qualified child nutrition professionals will provide students with access to a variety of affordable, nutritious, and appealing foods that meet the

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health and nutrition needs of students; will accommodate the religious, ethnic, and cultural diversity of the student body in meal planning; and will provide clean, safe, and pleasant settings and adequate time for students to eat.

To the maximum extent practicable, all campuses will participate in available federal school meal programs (including the School Breakfast Program, National School Lunch Program [including after-school snacks], Summer Food Service Program, Fruit and Vegetable Snack Program, and Child and Adult Care Food Program [including suppers]).

Campuses will provide nutrition education and physical education to foster lifelong habits of healthy eating and physical activity, and will establish linkages between health education and school meal programs, and with related community services.

TO ACHIEVE THESE POLICY GOALS: I. School Health Councils

CTA will create, strengthen, or work within existing school health councils to develop, implement, monitor, review, and, as necessary, revise school nutrition and physical activity policies. The councils also will serve as resources to school sites for implementing those policies. (A school health council consists of a group of individuals representing the school and community, and should include parents, students, representatives of the school food authority, members of the school board, school administrators, teachers, health professionals, and members of the public.)

II. Nutritional Quality of Foods and Beverages Sold and Served on Campus

School Meals

Meals served through the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs will:

be appealing and attractive to children;be served in clean and pleasant settings;

meet, at a minimum, nutrition requirements established by local, state, and federal statutes and regulations;

offer a variety of fruits and vegetables;1
serve only low-fat (1%) and fat-free milk2 and nutritionally-equivalent

non-dairy alternatives (to be defined by USDA); and ensure that half of the served grains are whole grain.3,3

Schools should engage students and parents, through taste-tests of new entrees and surveys, in selecting foods sold through the school meal programs in order to identify new, healthful, and appealing food choices. In addition, schools should share information about the nutritional content of meals with parents and students. Such information could be made available on menus, a website, on cafeteria menu boards, placards, or other point-of-purchase materials.

Breakfast. To ensure that all children have breakfast, either at home or at school, in order to meet their nutritional needs and enhance their ability to learn:

Schools will, to the extent possible, operate the School Breakfast Program.

Schools will, to the extent possible, arrange bus schedules and utilize methods to serve school breakfasts that encourage participation, including serving breakfast in the classroom, “grab-and-go” breakfast, or breakfast during morning break or recess.

Schools that serve breakfast to students will notify parents and students of the availability of the School Breakfast Program.

Schools will encourage parents to provide a healthy breakfast for their children through newsletter articles, take-home materials, or other means.

Free and Reduced-priced Meals. Schools will make every effort to eliminate any social stigma attached to, and prevent the overt identification of, students who are eligible for free and reduced-price school meals4. Toward this end, schools may utilize electronic identification and payment systems; provide meals at no charge to all children, regardless of income; promote the availability of school meals to all students; and/or use

1 To the extent possible, schools will offer at least two non-fried vegetable and two fruit options each day and will offer five different fruits and five different vegetables over the course of a week. Schools are encouraged to source fresh fruits and vegetables from local farmers when practicable.

2 As recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005.

3 A whole grain is one labeled as a “whole” grain product or with a whole grain listed as the primary grain ingredient in the ingredient statement. Examples include “whole” wheat flour, cracked wheat, brown rice, and oatmeal.

4 It is against the law to make others in the cafeteria aware of the eligibility status of children for free, reduced-price, or “paid” meals.

nontraditional methods for serving school meals, such as “grab-and-go” or classroom breakfast.

Summer Food Service Program. Schools in which more than 50% of students are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals will sponsor the Summer Food Service Program for at least six weeks between the last day of the academic school year and the first day of the following school year, and preferably throughout the entire summer vacation.

Meal Times and Scheduling. Schools:

will provide students with at least 10 minutes to eat after sitting down for breakfast and 20 minutes after sitting down for lunch;

should schedule meal periods at appropriate times, e.g., lunch should be scheduled between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.;

should not schedule tutoring, club, or organizational meetings or activities during mealtimes, unless students may eat during such activities;

will schedule lunch periods to follow recess periods (in elementary schools);

will provide students access to hand washing or hand sanitizing before they eat meals or snacks; and

should take reasonable steps to accommodate the tooth-brushing regimens of students with special oral health needs (e.g., orthodontia or high tooth decay risk).

Qualifications of School Food Service Staff. Qualified nutrition professionals will administer the school meal programs. As part of the LEA’s responsibility to operate a food service program, we will provide continuing professional development for all nutrition professionals in schools. Staff development programs should include appropriate certification and/or training programs for child nutrition directors, school nutrition managers, and cafeteria workers, according to their levels of responsibility.5

Sharing of Foods and Beverages. Schools should discourage students from sharing their foods or beverages with one another during meal or snack times, given concerns

about allergies and other restrictions on some children’s diets.

5 School nutrition staff development programs are available through the USDA, School Nutrition Association, and National Food Service Management Institute.

Foods and Beverages Sold Individually (i.e., foods sold outside of reimbursable school meals, such as through vending machines, cafeteria a la carte [snack] lines, fundraisers, school stores, etc.)

Elementary Schools. The school food service program will approve and provide all food and beverage sales to students in elementary schools. Given young children’s limited nutrition skills, food in elementary schools should be sold as balanced meals. If available, foods and beverages sold individually should be limited to low-fat and non-fat milk, fruits, and non-fried vegetables.

Middle School. In middle school, all foods and beverages sold individually outside the reimbursable school meal programs (including those sold through a la carte [snack] lines, vending machines, and student stores, or fundraising activities) during the school day, or through programs for students after the school day, will meet the following nutrition and portion size standards:

Beverages

Allowed: water or seltzer water6 without added caloric sweeteners; fruit

and vegetable juices and fruit-based drinks that contain at least 50% fruit juice and that do not contain additional caloric sweeteners; unflavored or flavored low-fat or fat-free fluid milk and nutritionally-equivalent nondairy beverages (to be defined by USDA);

Not allowed: soft drinks containing caloric sweeteners; sports drinks; iced teas; fruit-based drinks that contain less than 50% real fruit juice or that contain additional caloric sweeteners; beverages containing caffeine, excluding low-fat or fat-free chocolate milk (which contain trivial amounts of caffeine).

Foods

A food item sold individually:

o will have no more than 35% of its calories from fat (excluding nuts, seeds, peanut butter, and other nut butters) and 10% of its calories from saturated and trans fat combined;

o will have no more than 35% of its weight from added sugars;7

o will contain no more than 230 mg of sodium per serving for chips, cereals, crackers, French fries, baked goods, and other snack items; will contain no more than 480 mg of sodium per serving for pastas, meats, and soups; and will contain no more than 600 mg

6 Surprisingly, seltzer water may not be sold during meal times in areas of the school where food is sold or eaten because it is considered a “Food of Minimal Nutritional Value” (Appendix B of 7 CFR Part 210).

7 If a food manufacturer fails to provide the added sugars content of a food item, use the percentage of weight from total sugars (in place of the percentage of weight from added sugars), and exempt fruits, vegetables, and dairy foods from this total sugars limit.

of sodium for pizza, sandwiches, and main dishes.

A choice of at least two fruits and/or non-fried vegetables will be offered for sale at any location on the school site where foods are sold. Such items could include, but are not limited to, fresh fruits and vegetables; 100% fruit or vegetable juice; fruit-based drinks that are at least 50% fruit juice and that do not contain additional caloric sweeteners; cooked, dried, or canned fruits (canned in fruit juice or light syrup); and cooked, dried, or canned vegetables (that meet the above fat and sodium

guidelines).8 Portion Sizes:

Limit portion sizes of foods and beverages sold individually to those listed below:

o One and one-quarter ounces for chips, crackers, popcorn, cereal, trail mix, nuts, seeds, dried fruit, or jerky;

o One ounce for cookies;
o Two ounces for cereal bars, granola bars, pastries, muffins,

doughnuts, bagels, and other bakery items;
o Four fluid ounces for frozen desserts, including, but not limited to,

low-fat or fat-free ice cream;
o Eight ounces for non-frozen yogurt;
o Twelve fluid ounces for beverages, excluding water; and

o The portion size of a la carte entrees and side dishes, including potatoes, will not be greater than the size of comparable portions offered as part of school meals. Fruits and non-fried vegetables are exempt from portion-size limits.

Fundraising Activities. To support children’s health and school nutrition-education efforts, school fundraising activities will not involve food or will use only foods that meet the above nutrition and portion size standards for foods and beverages sold individually. Schools will encourage fundraising activities that promote physical activity. The LEA will make available a list of ideas for acceptable fundraising activities.

Snacks. Snacks served during the school day or in after-school care or enrichment programs will make a positive contribution to children’s diets and health, with an emphasis on serving fruits and vegetables as the primary snacks and water as the primary beverage. Schools will assess if and when to offer snacks based on timing of school meals, children’s nutritional needs, children’s ages, and other considerations. The LEA will disseminate a list of healthful snack items to teachers, after-school program

8 Schools that have vending machines are encouraged to include refrigerated snack vending machines, which can accommodate fruits, vegetables, yogurts, and other perishable items.

personnel, and parents.

If eligible, schools that provide snacks through after-school programs will pursue receiving reimbursements through the National School Lunch Program.

Rewards. Schools will not use foods or beverages, especially those that do not meet the nutrition standards for foods and beverages sold individually (above), as rewards for academic performance or good behavior,9 and will not withhold food or beverages (including food served through school meals) as a punishment.

Celebrations. Schools should limit celebrations that involve food during the school day to no more than one party per class per month. Each party should include no more than one food or beverage that does not meet nutrition standards for foods and beverages sold individually (above). The LEA will disseminate a list of healthy party ideas to parents and teachers.

School-sponsored Events (such as, but not limited to, athletic events, dances, or performances). Foods and beverages offered or sold at school-sponsored events outside the school day will meet the nutrition standards for meals or for foods and beverages sold individually (above).

III. Nutrition and Physical Activity Promotion and Food Marketing

Nutrition Education and Promotion. The LEA aims to teach, encourage, and support healthy eating by students. Schools should provide nutrition education and engage in nutrition promotion that:

is offered at each grade level as part of a sequential, comprehensive, standards-based program designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to promote and protect their health;

is part of not only health education classes, but also classroom instruction in subjects such as math, science, language arts, social sciences, and elective subjects;

includes enjoyable, developmentally-appropriate, culturally- relevant, participatory activities, such as contests, promotions, taste testing, farm visits, and school gardens;

promotes fruits, vegetables, whole grain products, low-fat and fat- free dairy products, healthy food preparation methods, and health-enhancing nutrition practices;

emphasizes caloric balance between food intake and energy expenditure (physical activity/exercise);

9 Unless this practice is allowed by a student’s individual education plan (IEP).

links with school meal programs, other school foods, and nutrition-related community services;

teaches media literacy with an emphasis on food marketing; and includes training for teachers and other staff.

Integrating Physical Activity into the Classroom Setting. For students to receive the nationally-recommended amount of daily physical activity (i.e., at least 60 minutes per day) and for students to fully embrace regular physical activity as a personal behavior, students need opportunities for physical activity beyond physical education class. Toward that end:

classroom health education will complement physical education by reinforcing the knowledge and self-management skills needed to maintain a physically-active lifestyle and to reduce time spent on sedentary activities, such as watching television;

opportunities for physical activity will be incorporated into other subject lessons; and

classroom teachers will provide short physical activity breaks between lessons or classes, as appropriate.

Communications with Parents. The LEA will support parents’ efforts to provide a healthy diet and daily physical activity for their children. The LEA will offer healthy eating seminars for parents, send home nutrition information, post nutrition tips on school websites, and provide nutrient analyses of school menus. Schools should encourage parents to pack healthy lunches and snacks and to refrain from including beverages and foods that do not meet the above nutrition standards for individual foods and beverages. More specifically, CTA will provide parents a list of foods that meet the National Lunch Program’s snack standards and ideas for healthy celebrations/parties, rewards, and fundraising activities. In addition, CTA will provide opportunities for parents to share their healthy food practices with others in the school community.

CTA will provide information about physical education and other school-based physical activity opportunities before, during, and after the school day; and support parents’ efforts to provide their children with opportunities to be physically active outside of school. Such supports will include sharing information about physical activity and physical education through a website, newsletter, or other take-home materials, special events, or physical education homework.

Food Marketing in Schools. School-based marketing will be consistent with nutrition education and health promotion. As such, schools will limit food and beverage marketing to the promotion of foods and beverages that meet the nutrition standards for meals or for foods and beverages sold individually (above).10 School-based marketing

10 Advertising of low-nutrition foods and beverages is permitted in supplementary classroom and library materials, such as newspapers, magazines, the Internet, and similar media, when such materials are used in a class lesson or activity, or as a research tool.

of brands promoting predominantly low-nutrition foods and beverages11 is prohibited. The promotion of healthy foods, including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products is encouraged.

Examples of marketing techniques include the following: logos and brand names on/in vending machines, books or curricula, textbook covers, school supplies, scoreboards, school structures, and sports equipment; educational incentive programs that provide food as a reward; programs that provide schools with supplies when families buy low- nutrition food products; in-school television, such as Channel One; free samples or coupons; and food sales through fundraising activities. Marketing activities that promote healthful behaviors (and are therefore allowable) include: vending machine covers promoting water; pricing structures that promote healthy options in a la carte lines or vending machines; sales of fruit for fundraisers; and coupons for discount gym memberships.

Staff Wellness. The LEA highly values the health and well-being of every staff member and will plan and implement activities and policies that support personal efforts by staff to maintain a healthy lifestyle. CTA should establish and maintain a staff wellness committee composed of at least one staff member, school health council member, local hospital representative, dietitian or other health professional, recreation program representative, union representative, and employee benefits specialist. (The staff wellness committee could be a subcommittee of the school health council.) The committee should develop, promote, and oversee a multifaceted plan to promote staff health and wellness. The plan should be based on input solicited from school staff and should outline ways to encourage healthy eating, physical activity, and other elements of a healthy lifestyle among school staff. The staff wellness committee should distribute its plan to the school health council annually.

IV. Physical Activity Opportunities and Physical Education

Daily Physical Education (P.E.) K-12. All students in grades K-8, including students with disabilities, special health-care needs, and in alternative educational settings, will receive daily physical education (or its equivalent of 150 minutes/week for elementary school students and 225 minutes/week for middle students) for the entire school year. All physical education will be taught by a certified physical education teacher. Student involvement in other activities involving physical activity

(e.g., interscholastic or intramural sports) will not be substituted for meeting the physical education requirement. Students will spend at least 50 percent of physical education class time participating in moderate to vigorous physical activity.

Daily Recess. All elementary school students will have at least 20 minutes a day of supervised recess, preferably outdoors, during which schools should encourage moderate to vigorous physical activity verbally and through the provision of space and equipment.

11 Schools should not permit general brand marketing for food brands under which more than half of the foods or beverages do not meet the nutrition standards for foods sold individually or the meals are not consistent with school meal nutrition standards.

Schools should discourage extended periods (i.e., periods of two or more hours) of inactivity. When activities, such as mandatory school-wide testing, make it necessary for students to remain indoors for long periods of time, schools should give students periodic breaks during which they are encouraged to stand and be moderately active.

Physical Activity Opportunities Before and After School. All elementary and middle schools will offer extracurricular physical activity programs, such as physical activity clubs or intramural programs. All middle schools as appropriate, will offer interscholastic sports programs. CTA will offer a range of activities that meet the needs, interests, and abilities of all students, including boys, girls, students with disabilities, and students with special health-care needs.

After-school child care and enrichment programs will provide and encourage – verbally and through the provision of space, equipment, and activities – daily periods of moderate to vigorous physical activity for all participants.

Physical Activity and Punishment. Teachers and other school and community personnel will not use physical activity (e.g., running laps, pushups) or withhold opportunities for physical activity (e.g., recess, physical education) as punishment.

Safe Routes to School. The LEA will assess and, if necessary and to the extent possible, make needed improvements to make it safer and easier for students to walk and bike to school. When appropriate, the LEA will work together with local public works, public safety, and/or police departments in those efforts. The LEA will explore the availability of federal “safe routes to school” funds, administered by the state department of transportation, to finance such improvements. The LEA will encourage students to use public transportation when available and appropriate for travel to school, and will work with the local transit agency to provide transit passes for students.

Use of School Facilities Outside of School Hours. School spaces and facilities should be available to students, staff, and community members before, during, and after the school day, on weekends, and during school vacations. These spaces and facilities also should be available to community agencies and organizations offering physical activity and nutrition programs. School policies concerning safety will apply at all times.

V. Monitoring and Policy Review

Monitoring. The Chief Administrative Officer or his/her designee will ensure compliance with established LEA nutrition and physical activity wellness policies. In each school, the Head of Schools will ensure compliance with those policies in his/her school and will report on the school’s compliance to the Chief Administrative Officer and Director of Complaince.

School food service staff will ensure compliance with nutrition policies within school food service areas and will report on this matter to the Director of Compliance and Head of Schools. In addition, the LEA will report on the most recent USDA School Meals Initiative (SMI) review findings and any resulting changes.

The Chief Administrative Officer or his/her designee will develop a summary report every three years on LEA compliance with the HRA’s established nutrition and physical activity wellness policies, based on input from schools. That report will be provided to the Board of Trustees and also distributed to all school health councils, parent/teacher organizations, Head of Schools, and school health services personnel.

Policy Review. To help with the initial development of the LEA’s wellness policies, each school will conduct a baseline assessment of the school’s existing nutrition and physical activity environments and policies.12 The results of those school-by-school assessments will be compiled at the LEA level to identify and prioritize needs.

Assessments will be repeated every three years to help review policy compliance, assess progress, and determine areas in need of improvement. As part of that review, the LEA will review our nutrition and physical activity policies; provision of an environment that supports healthy eating and physical activity; and nutrition and physical education policies and program elements. The LEA, and its schools, will, as necessary, revise the wellness policies and develop work plans to facilitate their implementation.

12 Useful self-assessment and planning tools include the School Health Index from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Changing the Scene from the Team Nutrition Program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Opportunity to Learn Standards for Elementary, Middle, and High School Physical Education from the National Association for Sport and Physical Education.

VI. Resources for Local School Wellness Policies on Nutrition and Physical Activity

Crosscutting:

School Health Index, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <http:// apps.nccd.cdc.gov/shi/>

Local Wellness Policy website, U.S. Department of Agriculture, <http:// www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Healthy/wellnesspolicy.html>

Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn: a School Health Policy Guide, National Association of State Boards of Education, <www.nasbe.org/HealthySchools/ fithealthy.mgi>

Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, <www.iom.edu/report.asp?id=22596>

The Learning Connection: The Value of Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity in Our Schools, Action for Healthy Kids, <www.actionforhealthykids.org/docs/ specialreports/LC%20Color%20_120204_final.pdf>

Ten Strategies for Promoting Physical Activity, Healthy Eating, and a Tobacco- free Lifestyle through School Health Programs, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/publications/pdf/ten_strategies.pdf>

Health, Mental Health, and Safety Guidelines for Schools, American Academy of Pediatrics and National Association of School Nurses, <http:// www.nationalguidelines.org>

Cardiovascular Health Promotion in Schools, American Heart Association [link to pdf]

School Health Councils:

Promoting Healthy Youth, Schools and Communities: A Guide to Community- School Health Councils, American Cancer Society [link to PDF]

Effective School Health Advisory Councils: Moving from Policy to Action, Public Schools of North Carolina, <www.nchealthyschools.org/nchealthyschools/htdocs/ SHAC_manual.pdf>

Nutrition:

General Resources on Nutrition

Making it Happen: School Nutrition Success Stories, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and
U.S. Department of Education, <http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/nutrition/ Making-It-Happen/>

Changing the Scene: Improving the School Nutrition Environment Toolkit,

U.S. Department of Agriculture, <www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Healthy/ changing.html>

Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture, <www.health.gov/ dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/>

Guidelines for School Health Programs to Promote Lifelong Healthy Eating,

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/ rr4509.pdf>

Healthy Food Policy Resource Guide, California School Boards Association and California Project LEAN, <www.csba.org/ps/hf.htm>

Diet and Oral Health, American Dental Association, <http://www.ada.org/ public/topics/diet.asp>

School Meals
• Healthy School Meals Resource System, U.S. Department of Agriculture,

<http://schoolmeals.nal.usda.gov/>

▪ School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study–II, a U.S. Department of Agriculture study of the foods served in the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program, <www.cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/ SNDAIIfind.pdf>

  • Local Support for Nutrition Integrity in Schools, American Dietetic Association, <www.eatright.org/Member/Files/Local.pdf>
  • Nutrition Services: an Essential Component of Comprehensive Health Programs, American Dietetic Association, <www.eatright.org/Public/ NutritionInformation/92_8243.cfm>
  • HealthierUS School Challenge, U.S. Department of Agriculture, <www.fns.usda.gov/tn/HealthierUS/index.htm>
  • Breakfast for Learning, Food Research and Action Center, <www.frac.org/ pdf/breakfastforlearning.PDF>
  • School Breakfast Scorecard, Food Research and Action Center, <www.frac.org/School_Breakfast_Report/2004/ >
  • Arkansas Child Health Advisory Committee Recommendations [includes recommendation for professional development for child nutrition professionals in schools], <www.healthyarkansas.com/advisory_committee/ pdf/final_recommendations.pdf>Meal Times and Scheduling

Eating at School: A Summary of NFSMI Research on Time Required by Students to Eat Lunch, National Food Service Management Institute (NFSMI) [Attach PDF file]

Relationships of Meal and Recess Schedules to Plate Waste in Elementary Schools, National Food Service Management Institute, <www.nfsmi.org/ Information/Newsletters/insight24.pdf >

Nutrition Standards for Foods and Beverages Sold Individually

Recommendations for Competitive Foods Standards (a report by the National Consensus Panel on School Nutrition), California Center for Public Health Advocacy, <www.publichealthadvocacy.org/school_food_standards/ school_food_stan_pdfs/Nutrition%20Standards%20Report%20- %20Final.pdf>

State policies for competitive foods in schools, U.S. Department of Agriculture, <www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Lunch/CompetitiveFoods/ state_policies_2002.htm>

Nutrition Integrity in Schools, (forthcoming), National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity

School Foods Tool Kit, Center for Science in the Public Interest, <www.cspinet.org/schoolfood/>

Foods Sold in Competition with USDA School Meal Programs (a report to Congress), U.S. Department of Agriculture, <www.cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/ Foods_Sold_in_Competition_with_USDA_School_Meal_Programs.pdf>

FAQ on School Pouring Rights Contracts, American Dental Association, <http://www.ada.org/public/topics/softdrink_faq.asp>

Fruit and Vegetable Promotion in Schools

Fruits and Vegetables Galore: Helping Kids Eat More, U.S. Department of Agriculture, <www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/fv_galore.html>

School Foodservice Guide: Successful Implementation Models for Increased Fruit and Vegetable Consumption, Produce for Better Health Foundation. Order on-line for $29.95 at <www.shop5aday.com/acatalog/

School_Food_Service_Guide.html>.

School Foodservice Guide: Promotions, Activities, and Resources to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Consumption, Produce for Better Health Foundation. Order on-line for $9.95 at <www.shop5aday.com/acatalog/ School_Food_Service_Guide.html>

National Farm-to-School Program website, hosted by the Center for Food and Justice, <www.farmtoschool.org>

Fruit and Vegetable Snack Program Resource Center, hosted by United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association, <http://www.uffva.org/ fvpilotprogram.htm>

Produce for Better Health Foundation website has downloadable fruit and vegetable curricula, research, activity sheets, and more at <www.5aday.org>

Fundraising Activities

Creative Financing and Fun Fundraising, Shasta County Public Health, <www.co.shasta.ca.us/Departments/PublicHealth/CommunityHealth/projlean/ fundraiser1.pdf>

Guide to Healthy School Fundraising, Action for Healthy Kids of Alabama, <www.actionforhealthykids.org/AFHK/team_center/team_resources/AL/N&PA %2031%20-%20Fundraising.pdf>

Snacks

Healthy School Snacks, (forthcoming), Center for Science in the Public Interest

Materials to Assist After-school and Summer Programs and Homeless Shelters in Using the Child Nutrition Programs (website), Food Research and Action Center, <www.frac.org/html/building_blocks/afterschsummertoc.html>

Rewards

Constructive Classroom Rewards, Center for Science in the Public Interest, <www.cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/constructive_rewards.pdf>

Alternatives to Using Food as a Reward, Michigan State University Extension, <www.tn.fcs.msue.msu.edu/foodrewards.pdf>

Prohibition against Denying Meals and Milk to Children as a Disciplinary Action, U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service [Link to PDF]

Celebrations

Guide to Healthy School Parties, Action for Healthy Kids of Alabama, <www.actionforhealthykids.org/AFHK/team_center/team_resources/AL/N&PA %2032%20-%20parties.pdf>

Classroom Party Ideas, University of California Cooperative Extension Ventura County and California Children’s 5 A Day Power Play! Campaign, <http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/files/filelibrary/2372/15801.pdf>

Nutrition and Physical Activity Promotion and Food Marketing:

Health Education

National Health Education Standards, American Association for Health

Education, <http://www.aahperd.org/aahe/pdf_files/standards.pdf>

Nutrition Education and Promotion

U.S. Department of Agriculture Team Nutrition website (lists nutrition education curricula and links to them), <www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Educators/ index.htm>

The Power of Choice: Helping Youth Make Healthy Eating and Fitness Decisions, U.S. Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service, <www.fns.usda.gov/tn/resources/ power_of_choice.html>

Nutrition Education Resources and Programs Designed for Adolescents,

compiled by the American Dietetic Association, <www.eatright.org/Public/index_19218.cfm>

Integrating Physical Activity into the Classroom Setting

Brain Breaks, Michigan Department of Education, <www.emc.cmich.edu/ brainbreaks>

Energizers, East Carolina University, <www.ncpe4me.com/energizers.html>

Food Marketing to Children

Pestering Parents: How Food Companies Market Obesity to Children, Center for Science in the Public Interest, <www.cspinet.org/ pesteringparents>

Review of Research on the Effects of Food Promotion to Children, United Kingdom Food Standards Agency, <www.foodstandards.gov.uk/multimedia/ pdfs/foodpromotiontochildren1.pdf>

Marketing Food to Children (a report on ways that different countries regulate food marketing to children [including marketing in schools]), World Health Organization (WHO), <http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/ 2004/9241591579.pdf>

Guidelines for Responsible Food Marketing to Children, Center for Science in the Public Interest, <http://cspinet.org/marketingguidelines.pdf>

Commercial Activities in Schools, U.S. General Accounting Office, <www.gao.gov/new.items/d04810.pdf>

Eating Disorders

Academy for Eating Disorders, <www.aedweb.org>
National Eating Disorders Association, <www.nationaleatingdisorders.org> Eating Disorders Coalition, <www.eatingdisorderscoalition.org>

Staff Wellness

School Staff Wellness, National Association of State Boards of Education [link to pdf]

Healthy Workforce 2010: An Essential Health Promotion Sourcebook for Employers, Large and Small, Partnership for Prevention, <www.prevent.org/ publications/Healthy_Workforce_2010.pdf>

Well Workplace Workbook: A Guide to Developing Your Worksite Wellness Program, Wellness Councils of America, <www.welcoa.org/wellworkplace/ index.php?category=7>

Protecting Our Assets: Promoting and Preserving School Employee Wellness, (forthcoming), Directors of Health Promotion and Education (DHPE)

Physical Activity Opportunities and Physical Education:

General Resources on Physical Activity

Guidelines for School and Community Programs to Promote Lifelong Physical Activity among Young People, Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention, <www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00046823.htm>

Healthy People 2010: Physical Activity and Fitness, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports,

<www.healthypeople.gov/document/HTML/ Volume2/22Physical.htm#_Toc490380803>

Physical Fitness and Activity in Schools, American Academy of Pediatrics, <http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/105/5/1156>

Physical Education

Opportunity to Learn: Standards for Elementary Physical Education, National Association for Sport and Physical Education. Order on-line for $7.00 at <http://member.aahperd.org/template.cfm? template=Productdisplay.cfm&productID=368&section=5>

Opportunity to Learn: Standards for Middle School Physical Education. National Association for Sport and Physical Education. Order on-line for $7.00 at <http://member.aahperd.org/Template.cfm? template=ProductDisplay.cfm&Productid=726&section=5>

Substitution for Instructional Physical Education Programs, National Association for Sport and Physical Education, <www.aahperd.org/naspe/ pdf_files/pos_papers/substitution.pdf>

Blueprint for Change, Our Nation’s Broken Physical Education System: Why It Needs to be Fixed, and How We Can Do It Together, PE4life, <www.pe4life.org/articles/blueprint2004.pdf>

Recess

Recess in Elementary Schools, National Association for Sport and Physical Education, <www.aahperd.org/naspe/pdf_files/pos_papers/current_res.pdf>

Recess Before Lunch Policy: Kids Play and then Eat, Montana Team Nutrition, <www.opi.state.mt.us/schoolfood/recessBL.html>

Relationships of Meal and Recess Schedules to Plate Waste in Elementary Schools, National Food Service Management Institute, <www.nfsmi.org/ Information/Newsletters/insight24.pdf>

The American Association for the Child’s Right to Play, <http:// www.ipausa.org/recess.htm>

Physical Activity Opportunities Before and After School

Guidelines for After School Physical Activity and Intramural Sport Programs,

National Association for Sport and Physical Education, <www.aahperd.org/ naspe/pdf_files/pos_papers/intramural_guidelines.pdf>

Rights and Responsibilities of Interscholastic Athletes, National Association for Sport and Physical Education, <www.aahperd.org/naspe/pdf_files/ pos_papers/RightandResponsibilities.pdf>

Safe Routes to School

Safe Routes to Schools Tool Kit, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, <www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/pedbimot/bike/ saferouteshtml/>

KidsWalk to School Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, <www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/kidswalk/>

Walkability Check List, Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center, Partnership for a Walkable America, U.S. Department of Transportation, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, <www.walkinginfo.org/ walkingchecklist.htm>

 

Monitoring and Policy Review:

School Health Index, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), <http:// apps.nccd.cdc.gov/shi/>

Changing the Scene: Improving the School Nutrition Environment Toolkit, U.S. Department of Agriculture, <www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Healthy/changing.html>

Criteria for Evaluating School-Based Approaches to Increasing Good Nutrition and Physical Activity, Action for Healthy Kids, <www.actionforhealthykids.org/ docs/specialreports/report_small.pdf>

Opportunity to Learn: Standards for Elementary Physical Education, National Association for Sport and Physical Education. Order on-line for $7.00 at <http:// member.aahperd.org/template.cfm? template=Productdisplay.cfm&productID=368&section=5>

Opportunity to Learn: Standards for Middle School Physical Education. National Association for Sport and Physical Education. Order on-line for $7.00 at <http:// member.aahperd.org/Template.cfm? template=ProductDisplay.cfm&Productid=726&section=5>


a. Illness or injury of the child or the child’s family member which requires hospitalization or bed rest.

b. Physician or dentist appointment.

c. Infectious disease or parasitic infestation

d. Funeral service, memorial service, or bereavement upon the death of the child’s family member.

e. Life-threatening illness or injury of the child’s family member.

f. Compliance with a court order (e.g. visitation, subpoena).

g. Special educator or related services as defined in 10 U.S.C. 1401 (2004) for the child’s disability.

h. Observance of a religious holiday or service, because the child’s or parent’s religion forbids secular activity on the instructional day.

i. Extraordinary circumstances beyond the control of the child and the child’s parent.

A note that explains the reason for the child’s absence must be sent following each absence.

After seven excused absences, someone other than the parent such as a doctor must document the excused absence.

Excessive absence is defined as seven (7) or more unexcused absences. Excessive absence will result in a mandatory attendance conference. Ten (10) or more unexcused absences will result in an Educational Neglect Report submitted to the District of Columbia’s Child & Family Service Agency.


a. Three (3) or more unexcused absences and/or unexcused t ardies will result with a phone call and letter home.

b. Three (3) consecutive unexcused absences will result with a phone call to parent, guardian and/or emergency contact. If parent, guardian and/or emergency contact cannot be reached, CTA will contact Metropolitan Police Department to have them complete a safety/wellness check to ensure student’s safety.

c. Five (5) unexcused absences and/or unexcused tardies will result with a phone call, letter and mandatory attendance conference.

d. Seven (7) unexcused absences and/or unexcused tardies will result with a phone call, letter and Educational Neglect Report submitted to the District of Columbia’s Child & Family Service Agency.

e. Ten (10) unexcused absences will result with a letter, mandatory attendance conference and a second Educational Neglect Report submitted to the District of Columbia’s Child & Family Service Agency. Your admissions will be terminated from the program.

f. Trips and vacations are not considered lawful excuses and student’s absences will be coded “Unexcused Absence”.


The GREEN TEAM is our reward system, which recognizes school success: attendance, uniforms and behavior. On Fridays, students will receive a certificate and reward from the Principal’s treasure box. Please help your child earn GREEN TEAM recognition; see the rubric below.  With your help, we will work together to ensure a successful school year!

THE GREEN TEAM RUBRIC

Attendance Requirement

On-time and present (the entire day) 4 out of 5 days


Uniform Requirement

Must be in the complete school uniform, logo shirt and khaki bottom

Behavior Requirement

Must have earned green for positive classroom behavior 4 out of 5 school days and 3 out of 4 school days (holidays)



ATTENDANCE POLICY

Research studies in education show that school attendance is a major factor affecting student achievement, as chronic absenteeism is a proven, early warning sign of academic risk and school dropout, according to Attendance Works and Child & Family Policy Center. Parents, guardians, and students must adhere to the attendance policy and procedures below and should refer to the school calendar, when scheduling appointments and vacations.

Students enrolled are considered lawfully absent (Excused Absence/Excused Tardy) from school, including absence for any portion of the day, unless under the following conditions:

  1. a)  Illness or injury of the child or the child’s family member which requires hospitalization or bed rest.
  2. b)  Physician or dental appointment.
  3. c)  Infectious disease or parasitic infestation.
  4. d)  Funeral service, memorial service, or bereavement upon the death of the child’sfamily member.
  5. e)  Life-threatening illness or injury of the child’s family member.
  6. f)  Compliance with a court order (e.g. visitation, subpoena).
  7. g)  Special educator or related services as defined in 10 U.S.C. 1401 (2004) for thechild’s disability.
  8. h)  Observance of a religious holiday or service, because the child’s or parent’sreligion forbids secular activity on the instructional day.
  9. i)  Extraordinary circumstances beyond the control of the child’s parent.

A note that explains the reason for the child’s absence must be sent following each absence (-no later than 5 days after the absence, see attached attendance letter/Appendix B). Parents and/or guardians will receive daily messages when students are absent and tardy via School Messenger. Teachers and Student Support Staff will also contact families when students are experiencing excessive tardies, early dismissals and unexcused absences. If a student arrives after 8:30am, they are considered unexcused tardy.

UNEXCUSED ABSENCES

  • Three (3) or more unexcused absences and/or unexcused tardies will result with a phone call and letter home.
  • Three (3) consecutive unexcused absences will result with a phone call to parent, guardian and/or emergency contact. If parent, guardian and/or emergency contact cannot be reached, Cedar Tree Academy will contact Metropolitan Police Department to have them complete a safety/wellness check to ensure student’s safety.
  • Five (5) unexcused absences and/or unexcused tardies will result with a phone call, letter and mandatory attendance conference with the attendance monitor.
  • Seven (7) unexcused absences and/or unexcused tardies will result with a phone call and additional letter. Executive director will be notified of absences.
  • Ten (10) unexcused absences will result with a letter, mandatory attendance conference and Educational Neglect Report submitted to the District of Columbia’s Child & Family Service Agency (after the second day of the 10th unexcused absence).
  • Twenty (20) consecutive unexcused absences will result in dismissal from Cedar Tree Academy.Note: Trips and vacations will be coded as unexcused absences.ATTENDANCE APPEAL PROCESSA written appeal may be filed by a parent on behalf of any student receiving a reduced or a failing grade(s) due to unexcused absences. An appeal shall be submitted to the principal of the school within ten (10) business days after receipt of the failing grade(s).Upon receipt of an appeal, the principal shall appoint an Appeals Panel and shall forward all written appeal requests to the panel chairperson within three (3) business days.I. The Appeals Panel referenced above shall consist of not less than three (3) members to be selected from the following:(a) The principal’s designee, who shall be the panel chairperson; (b) A school counselor;
    (c) A department chairperson;
    (d) A teacher, other than the one involved;(e) An attendance staff person;(f) A parent organization representative.
  1. Appropriate substitutions in the Appeals Panel described above may be made, when necessary.
  2. The Appeals Panel shall hold a hearing within ten (10) calendar days after its appointment by the principal.
  1. The parent, guardian or duly authorized representative shall appear at the hearing. One of these individuals shall be given the opportunity to present the student’s case and upon request, to question the involved teacher and to be duly informed of the panel’s recommendations.
  2. Each appeals panelist, including the chair, shall have an equal vote.
  3. In the case of a tie vote, the Appeals Panel shall recommend that the initial grade be upheld.
  4. The Appeals Panel’s recommendation shall be forwarded immediately to the principal who shall issue the Panel’s decision within ten (10) calendar days after the hearing.
  5. When an appeal is filed, the Cedar Tree Board of Directors shall convene a hearing and shall issue the final administrative decision in the matter.
  6. The following procedural guidelines shall apply to hearings convened as described above:
    1. a)  The burden to show why the grade(s) in question should be changed shall be on the student’s parent or guardian;
    2. b)  Strict rules of evidence shall not apply;
    3. c)  Testimony or evidence shall be heard from both parties; and
    4. d)  A written determination shall be issued within five (5) business days ofthe hearing.Cedar Tree AcademyAttendance Policy Acknowledgement Form

I, _______________________________________________(Parent/Guardian Name) of ____________________________ (Child’s Name)

I have read the Cedar Tree Academy’s Early Childhood Attendance Policy and agree to the terms described therein. I acknowledge that 20 consecutive unexcused absences without written documentation may be cause for dis-enrollment from the program as determined solely by the principal or designee. I agree to send in a note each time my child is absent from the program, no later than five days upon my child’s return.

Parent/Guardian Signature Date


Cedar Tree Academy Public Charter School is currently participating in the National School Lunch Program. Under this program breakfast, lunch, and snack will be available to all students. The program follows USDA meal patterns requirements, rules and regulations.

Non-Discrimination Statement 

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1) Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights

1400 Independence Avenue, SW

Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2) Fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3) Email: program.intake@usda.gov.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339; or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Also, the District of Columbia Human Rights Act, approved December 13, 1977 (DC Law 2-38; DC Official Code §2-1402.11(2006), as amended) states the following:

Pertinent section of DC Code § 2-1402.11:

It shall be an unlawful discriminatory practice to do any of the following acts, wholly or partially for a discriminatory reason based upon the actual or perceived: race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, personal appearance, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, family responsibilities, genetic information, disability, matriculation, or political affiliation of any individual. To file a complaint alleging discrimination on one of these bases, please contact the District of Columbia’s Office of Human Rights at (202) 727-4559 or ohr@dc.gov.

 


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Cedar Tree Academy: A Community Of Academic Excellence

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